“Iacocca from Chrysler Corporation, Allentown Pennsylvania, and the Cocaine Ring”, by Kimberly Koerber-Bauer-Koerber

audio post 2012 10 07 14 05 20I was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylania, and had a lot of ‘action’ occur in m life as a kid.  The stell industry is where my grandfoather on both sides of the family worked.  This action, detailed below, came from another area of Pennsylvania, not far away.audio post 2012 10 07 14 05 20

In Colors of Grey and Green with an American Flag

Below is a song written by Billy Joel about the shutdown of factories in Allentown, Pennsylvania.  When the steel production factories shut down, theorists think that some of the old factories were revamped and other crews moved in to manufacture cocaine in the United States with a cohesive group of friends.  These factories still could exist and probably exist in some of the Boon-dock or very rural areas, but are not marked as such. If cocaine is manufactured and processed in one area, it is probably sold in another area and the people involved ‘stick together’. The Chrysler Iacocca Family probably got involved in this because they were already part of the steel industry to being with and part of Chrysler Corporation for many years.

**********************************************************************************

 

“Allentown” by Billy Joel

And they’re closing all the factories down
Out in Bethlehem they’re killing time
Filling out forms
Standing in line
Well our fathers fought the Second World War
Spent their weekends on the Jersey Shore
Met our mothers in the USO
Asked them to dance
Danced with them slow
And we’re living here in Allentown
But the restlessness was handed down
And it’s getting very hard to stay
Well we’re waiting here in Allentown
For the Pennsylvania we never found
For the promises our teachers gave
If we worked hard
If we behaved
So the graduations hang on the wall


But they never really helped us at all
No they never taught us what was real
Iron and coke
And chromium steel
And we’re waiting here in Allentown
But they’ve taken all the coal from the ground
And the union people crawled away
Every child had a pretty good shot
To get at least as far as their old man got
But something happened on the way to that place
They an American flag in our face
Well I’m living here in Allentown
And it’s hard to keep a good man down
But I won’t be getting up today
And we’re living here in Allentown

Next, A song below about people who are from “the Boondocks audio post 2012 10 07 14 05 20 areas, like each other and stick together from http://www.elyrics.net/read/l/little-big-town-lyrics/boondocks-lyrics.html:

Boondocks lyrics
Songwriters: Childers, Karen Fairchild; Westbrook, James Lee; Roads, Kimberly; Kirkpatrick, Wayne; Sweet, Phillip;

I feel no shame
I’m proud of where I came from
I was born and raised in the boondocks

One thing I know
No matter where I go
I keep my heart and soul in the boondocks

And I can feel
That muddy water running through my veins
And I can hear that lullaby of a midnight train
And it sings to me and it sounds familiar

I feel no shame
I’m proud of where I came from
I was born and raised in the boondocks

One thing I know
No matter where I go
I keep my heart and soul in the boondocks

And I can taste
That honeysuckle and it’s still so sweet
When it grows wild
On the banks down at old camp creek
Yeah, and it calls to me like a warm wind blowing

I feel no shame
I’m proud of where I came from
I was born and raised in the boondocks

One thing I know
No matter where I go
I keep my heart and soul in the boondocks

It’s where I learned about living
It’s where I learned about love
It’s where I learned about working hard
And having a little was just enough

It’s where I learned about Jesus
And knowing where I stand
You can take it or leave it
This is me, this is who I am

Give me a tin roof
A front porch and a gravel road
And that’s home to me
It feels like home to me

I feel no shame
I’m proud of where I came from
I was born and raised in the boondocks

One thing I know
No matter where I go
I keep my heart and soul in the boondocks
I keep my heart and soul in the boondocks

You get a line, I get a pole
We’ll go fishing in the crawfish hole
Five card poker on Saturday night
Church on Sunday morning

You get a line, I get a pole
(You get a line, I get a pole)
We’ll go fishing
(We’ll go fishing in the crawfish hole)
Down in the boondocks
(Five card poker on Saturday night)
Church on Sunday morning

You get a line, I get a pole
(You get a line, I get a pole)
We’ll go fishing
(We’ll go fishing in the crawfish hole)
Down in the boondocks
(Five card poker on Saturday night)
(Say a little prayer for me)
Church on Sunday morning

You get a line, I get a pole
(You get a line, I get a pole)
We’ll go fishing
(We’ll go fishing in the crawfish hole)
Down in the boondocks
(Five card poker on Saturday night)
(Say a little prayer for me)
Church on Sunday morning
*******************************************************************************************

Uh-oh.  Looks like big trouble that has been with us since probably….the 60’s which has gotten worse and worse. More will be revealed.

This is current in regard to employment – from The Columbus, Dispatch, via Yahoo News:

Factories post rebound, consumer sentiment shaky

By Jason Lange | Reuters – 3 hrs ago

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Manufacturing grew in November at its quickest pace in five months, with a rise in domestic demand hinting that factories could provide a boost to economic growth in the fourth quarter.

Other data on Wednesday showed a drop in new claims for jobless benefits, although they remained elevated due to superstorm Sandy, and only a marginal improvement in consumer sentiment.

Financial information firm Markit said its U.S. “flash,” or preliminary, manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index rose to 52.4 from a three-year low of 51.0 in October. A reading above 50 points to growth in the factory sector.

Still, economists cautioned against taking the reading at face value as other gauges of manufacturing have looked softer, including readings for new orders and regional business sentiment surveys.

“We’re still not exactly going gangbusters,” said Sarah Watt, an analyst at Wells Fargo in Charlotte, North Carolina. “The data point to modest growth.”

Economists expect U.S. economic growth will slow in the fourth quarter to a lackluster 1.6 percent annual rate from a 2.0 percent rate in the prior three months, according to a Reuters poll conducted on November 15.

Some respondents in Markit’s survey said efforts to rebuild after Sandy may have accounted for some of the increased demand.

The storm continues to make it more difficult to read the underlying health of the economy. Jobless claims surged after the deadly storm hit the U.S. East Coast on October 29 but last week retraced about half of that rise. Factory output and retail sales contracted last month, largely due to the storm.

Most of these effects are expected to be temporary, but even taking that into account, the U.S. economy appears to be stuck in low gear. Europe’s debt crisis is weighing on the global economy and U.S. businesses appear hesitant to ramp up hiring and investment with the government on course to slash the country’s budget deficit next year.

“Stripping out the short-term boost from Sandy … and (factory) output is probably flat,” said Paul Dales, an economist with Capital Economics in London. “That’s unlikely to change much when the global economy is set to remain weak.”

THROUGH THE EYE OF THE STORM

The Labor Department said initial claims for state unemployment benefits dropped 41,000 to a seasonally adjusted 410,000. Sandy had driven first-time filings up by 90,000 in the prior week.

Economists said that while the still-high level of claims reflected the storm’s impact, it also likely pointed to more fundamental problems in the jobs market.

“There appears to be a noticeable deceleration of growth in the fourth quarter,” said Peter Hooper, an economist at Deutsche Bank in New York. “It would not be surprising if some of the new jobless claims are due to underlying weakness,” he said.

U.S. financial markets showed little reaction to the data as investors focused on developments in Europe and trading slowed ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday. U.S. stocks rose, while Treasury debt prices were down modestly.

The claims report covered the same week when the Labor Department collects data for its estimate on hiring in November. It suggested that report, due on December 7, could prove soft, although not all analysts expect a significant storm impact. Nonfarm payrolls grew 171,000 in October.

“We are expecting things to be in the neighborhood of what we have seen, maybe with a pullback in light of the hurricane,” said Bricklin Dwyer, an economist at BNP Paribas in New York.

CONSUMER SPIRIT

Growth in the U.S. economy has looked uneven in recent months, with business investment sagging due to fears about U.S. fiscal policy, while consumer spending and the housing market have shown some strength.

At the end of November, several months of improvement in U.S. consumer sentiment stalled as uncertainty grew over whether lawmakers would steer clear of planned tax hikes and government spending cuts, a survey showed.

The Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan’s final November reading on the overall index on consumer sentiment came in at 82.7, a touch up from 82.6 the month before, but down from a preliminary reading of 84.9 released earlier in the month.

Separately, a gauge of future U.S. economic activity rose marginally in October, pointing to modest near-term growth.

“Based on the trends, the economy will continue to expand modestly through the early months of 2013,” said Ken Goldstein, an economist at the Conference Board, which released the report.

Other data showed applications for U.S. home mortgages eased last week, though demand for new loans improved.

(Additional reporting by Steven C. Johnson, Edward Krudy, Ellen Freilich and Richard Leong in New York; further reporting by Lucia Mutikani in Washington; Editing by Andrea Ricci)

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